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Posts Tagged ‘flower’

I crocheted this Kitchen Scrubbie with the very last strands of my Sugar ‘n Cream stash.  I ran out of Hot Blue after making the body so, I had to dig around in my small scraps basket for a very short strand of Summer Splash cotton yarn.  Fortunately, the variegated matched the blue body and the green color makes it looks like a flower stem.

The pattern calls for a size J hook but I went with a size I hook since my size J hook is MIA at the moment. (Angela, I loose them too!) The scrubbie itself consists of two layers chain loops and a slip stitch handle.  The double layer construction may confuse beginning crocheters, but the idea is easy enough.  

Here you can see the ‘inside’ of the scrubbie.

This kitchen scrubbie could double as a bath poof since the stitches aren’t too tight.  It would probably dry just fine.  If a reinforced handle were added it would also make a nice duster. 

 

This was a nice distraction from my top secret Swap Swap Gals purses.  I’ll get to that in a later post!

*That’s cool* a random fact

Scientists in Japan claim they have developed the first true blue roses by extracting the gene for blue pigment (delphinidin) from pansies.

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Happy Easter everyone!  If you have some extra blog time today, vote for your favorite rain cloud over at Knits and Knots.

*That’s cool* a random fact

Wet air is less dense than dry air with temperature as a constant.

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I have more than enough WIPs and computer upkeep to keep me busy, but I just couldn’t resist a few little projects.  They are entertaining until all those little ends catch up with you! 

Hopefully people are managing with the error in color scheme for the Through Any Window Baby Blanket Tutorial.  The corrected tutorial is slowly coming together. 

This tan Crochet Headband, below, consists of a few easily crocheted flowers.  The pattern calls for four motifs, but I threw in one more as a tiny bit of procrastination.  Since each motif was made individually, all those loose ends were no fun. 

The pattern directs you to leave a ten inch tail when you finish off, which is then used to connect the motifs.  Next time I crochet this headband I would just slip stitch across a ch-5 loop for a quicker, join-as-you-go assembly. 

 

Just like the Elizabeth headband I made last Christmas, the wrong side almost makes this headband reversible.  Each flower petal is a cluster of double crochet stitches which bulge on the bottom side. 

Mandi of On Hooks and Needles made a pretty green cotton version back in May 2007.  Mine is made of some scrap Red Heart Super Saver in Cashmere. 

Andrea’s “Woven” Dishcloth gives the stitch multiple so you can easily customize the dishcloth size.  I used a starting chain of twenty-six with a size F hook.  The actual dishcloth measures 6″x 6″.  I also replaced the double crochet stitches in Row 1 for half double crochet stitches. 

This dishcloth packs a lot of cotton in a little square.  Back and front post stitches are alternated in each row with a tight gauge.  This results in a tough, durable structure and a nice, bumpy texture. 

Andrea has a blog contest running until 2pm CT, March 23rd.  To enter the contest, make up the mystery pattern and e-mail her a description and/or picture.  Even if you can’t participate, check out her blog after the deadline to vote for the best entry! 

Also, check out her review of A Whole Load of Craft along with a short interview about my crafty beginnings.

*That’s cool* a random fact

The Pink and White Lady Slipper (cypriedium reginae), illegal to pick in Minnesota, takes over a decade to produce it’s first flower.

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I finally got to make this Starburst Hotpad. Ever since I saw Angela’s orange and pink version on Ravelry I have wanted to crochet my own. The only thing stopping me was the lengthy assembly directions. They seemed complicated, but the hotpad isn’t as daunting as I predicted. The hotpad makes sense once you have the pieces made and it all pulls together for the final step.

I tacked down the petal edges when I wove in the ends. Next time I would do this with a little more ease since there are visible creases. I used Lily’s Sugar and Cream in Bright Navy and Over the Rainbow. With the granny square holes, I’m not sure if I would use this as a hot pad, but it makes a sturdy trivet.

The Circular Cloth pattern is very simple and easy to follow. Perfect for the beginner wanting to practice increases in the round before tackling a hat. I used half a skein of Lily in Summer Splash.

In hindsight this dishcloth would have looked better with a contrasting border. The picture for the free pattern even has an orange border around a white center, but by the time I realized this I had already tucked and cut the ends. The back-loops-only do make nice ridges for scrubbing though.

The Crochet Hexagon Dishcloth is adapted from a Japanese pattern and the origin shows in the writing style. It took a few tries before I understood the notation.

My real problem was the recommended size G hook made this dishcloth bend in a cup shape. I had to use a size I crochet hook to get it relatively flat, and then I blocked it to keep the shells down. The blocking wasn’t really necessary though, and it made the shells look more pointed than they were originally crocheted because I’m still learning to block well.

The dishcloth is crocheted in Lily’s in Soft Teal. The simple, solid look of this pattern is really pleasing and a few of these in coordinating colors would make a nice gift.

Finally, in lieu of a random fact, I give you a YouTube video. Compliments of Geckogrrl, here’s a music video from the Canadian group Tricot Machine.  All the frames are knit!

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I found these photos of this Flower Garden Scarf motif blanket buried in my Flickr photo collection. I’ve been working, little by little, to get my Flickr account pictures updated with pattern and blog post links. I find it’s really helpful when others put these links up, so I’m trying to do this myself, but the process is really time consuming!

I’ve had to space it out, working on a few photos at a time. The job is pretty much complete. Now I’ll just have to keep up with all the new blog photos, not to mention Ravelry notebook upkeep. (How did a little hobby get to be so time consuming?)
So, about the actual blanket. The Flower Garden Scarf pattern from Stitch ‘n Bitch: The Happy Hooker is the basis of the whole blanket. Basically I made the scarf and just kept going. I learned the join-as-you-go technique crocheting the flowers together and I am convinced this is the best way to put together motifs.

I’d like to try the Prairie Star afghan at some point, and that’s joined the same way. The Moonstitches blog has a great tutorial on join-as-you-go piecing, using photos from her beautiful hexagon blanket.

Another project I worked on last summer was the Daisy Flower Charity Square for Krochet Krystal.  I used Krystal’s photo from her blog because I never took a picture for myself.  (Thanks Krystal!)

The pattern is free, but you are required to join a Yahoo! group and she asks that you donate a square to her cause as well. The top four are mine and each one took about 20-35 minutes to make. These squares are challenging to work, but the finished square is solid and very striking.

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I finally settled on a shawl pattern from the Spring/Summer 1977 edition of Good Housekeeping Needlecraft.  There’s no picture of the magazine on the Internet that I can find, but the cover looks similar to a picture on Flickr.  I’ll get a snapshot of my copy posted later on.

I’m halfway through the first part of the center panel and I really like the way the shawl is coming together.  You make three circles and two oval shapes chained together in four rounds and then a mesh is crocheted around the motif. 

The pattern is called the Doily Shawl and I’d rate the difficulty as advanced for the odd directions and construction.  When I first saw the project photo, it reminded me of the Wild Rose Shawl from the cover of the Winter 2007 Interweave Crochet, minus the flowers. 

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This is a small sample of the Progressive Pattern Stitch Afghan with Bernat Baby Coordinates Sweet Stripes.  I had some yarn left over from the Chromium Star Blanket and ended up using one full skein before the warping upper left hand corner got to me. 

Maybe a heavy border would help the misshapen corner and plump the size a little.  I guess I could also try blocking it, but I’ll most likely put it in snooze mode and try to find a charity that would take it.  I really don’t feel any drive to improve or finish this particular blanket.   

I do like the way the blanket is worked though, similar to a mitered square.  You crochet a bunch of chain loops on two sides of the square and turn.  The second row uses granny-style shell groups in each chain loop.  Because there are only two different rows the pattern is easily memorized. 

Plus, I personally am partial to exponential blanket construction.  It’s relaxing to watch a blanket grow, knowing that you can use the maximum amount of a skein without worrying that you’ll run out.  Using this pattern in the round would probably hold the shape better, like Robyn‘s  Baby Blanket on Flickr.  I like how her color changes compliment the pattern. 

*That’s cool* a random fact

Yellow roses symbolize friendship and sociability. 

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