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Posts Tagged ‘snow’

I finished the knit boucle scarf for my mom.  Even though the pattern was very simple it took a lot longer to make than I’m used to.  There are more stitches to the inch compared to crochet and being a slow knitter doesn’t exactly speed things along. 

When I did finally finish the knitting I still wanted to embroider something simple in the corner.  After deciding on a treble clef, I put an image through knitPro to get one of those nifty graphs.  Originally, I intended to try out the duplicate stitch technique but the Caron SS yarn was fatally hidden by the boucle.  Those little tufts of yarn buried my best attempts. 

Since the duplicate stitch didn’t look right, I tried the back stitch.  Even with two strands together all that fuzzy boucle still got in the way, so I finally came to the conclusion that the crochet slip stitch was my only option.   

The slip stitches turned out to be just what I was looking for.  The only downfall is you have to free hand a bit more than the embroidery (exactly the reason I put it off).  The extra effort was worth it, though.  The slip stitch made the curves look much nicer than the embroidery and the raised effect makes the insignia really pop. 

My favorite part of the slip stitch technique is the opposite side.  Since I wove the ends in back through the treble clef, the backside doesn’t look that much different from the front.  See the gray yarn outline through the back?   

This scarf was made just in time, too.  We got four inches of snow yesterday and then a few more today.  What’s weird is that it snows during the night and early morning and then it’s really warm and sunny during the day.

During the day, on account of the warm weather, the snow trapped on tree branches melt off randomly in clumps.  It sounds like it’s raining all around in short, heavy bursts – defintely an auditory experience.  Plus, every once in a while when I was under a tree (hard not to do around here) I got smacked in the head with an ‘organic’ snowball courtesy of Mother Nature.  

*That’s cool* a random fact

The treble clef is also known as the G clef because one end circles around the ‘G line’.

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I have lots of crochet projects finished but have been rather lazy getting them documented so I thought I’d throw you readers a few non-craft related photographs a la Niki.  If you read the blog Knockout Niki Crochets then you’re familiar with her photo randomness posts.  The basic idea is to blog seven or more random photographs vertically in a single post.

Oh and check out Niki’s Etsy shop for prints of her photographs and crochet projects.  I’m especially fond of the crocheted chess clutch.   

I think the last photo would make a good wallpaper.  Don’t you think?   

When it was warmer I’d use my camera on walks and shoot the landscape.  I haven’t been taking the camera out much these days because it rains and if I just stand in one place I get cold.  Then my fingers go numb holding the camera and my toes feel like ice because I wear flip flops.  I realize I could be warmer with ‘real’ shoes but I like my flip flops.   

Speaking of photos, here are some photography pointers I’ve come across on the web.  I have a regular point and shoot camera and I’m not a photo expert but these little tips have helped me a lot, especially with my crochet projects.   

In general: 

Natural sunlight is best.  Use the tungsten setting for artificial light.   

Direct sun on a nice day is too bright for most subjects.  Try the shade.   

Don’t take photos with the light source directly behind the subject.  I’m guilty of not following this one because the window is such an enticing backdrop. 

Turn off the flash or greatly reduce the output for accurate colors.

Reduce camera shake by propping your body and arm against something.

Odd numbers are better than even. 

Use the rule of thirds.

For close up shots:

Use the flower/macro setting.

Don’t use the zoom.  

That’s enough about photography.  I promise an actual craft-related photo in the next post!

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No two alike

I’ve never made crochet snowflakes before.  To be sure, crochet snowflakes are on my to do list, but they’ll have to wait for another year or so before I actually tackle them.  I have the hooks and a little white thread but all the blocking and such seems too involved.  These were dug out of the family ornament box.  We’ve got lots of snowflakes in that box but most of them are plastic or metal. 

I like this crochet one with the flower in center.  But shhh, it’s store bought.     

These two snowflakes below have survived a handful of Christmases and a move.  The stiffener has loosened a little but I think it gives them character.  If ever needed, a little starch and TLC will restore them to tip top shape. 

They were handmade a few years back by a family friend when my maternal grandfather died.  She made a bunch of snowflakes and gave them to each family member.  I’ll always be thankful for her sweet gesture. 

My uncle died a few days ago and it seems fitting that I was preparing to blog about them.  They are tokens of remembrance for a life that has passed. 

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Here in the San Juan Islands we got a few humble inches of the white winter stuff today.  The snow covered almost every surface, just not very well.  It’s good for packing though.  If there’s more snow tomorrow I want to make a snowman.  There should be enough to make a little one. 

I’ve been on a short hiatus from the actual act of crocheting and with my hooks on vacation and all, I took them outside to enjoy the view. 

I am busy with crochet related business though, organizing the testing session for my new free granny blanket pattern.  You can read the thread on Crochetville and see what the testers have swatched. 

If you’re just itching for a granny square blanket and can’t wait for the free pattern to turn up, give these a gander:  

Microspun version on the Lion Brand website has a similar color scheme. 

For giant granny square worked in the round with a shell border try the Large Granny Square Blankie by Lisa Wolf at Bev’s Country Cottage

In other news the snow completely covered the Christmas – ahem – holiday lights that are coiled around the deck.  Little by little they melted quarter sized circles all along the deck.  Scientifically speaking, it was interesting to see how much snow a little bulb could melt but I didn’t give it much attention.  

Then at dusk I saw that the light illuminated the snow surrounding the bulb and it looked like a bunch of tiny glowing votives.  They seem very cozy in their little snow caves. 

 

*That’s cool* a random fact

Thomas Edison tried over 1,500 different materials for the filament in his first lightbulb including fishing line, coconut fibers and hair taken from a friend’s beard. 

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