Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘hat’

 

This Thick Warm Crocheted Winter Hat lives up to it’s title.  With front post stitches for insulation, my brother loves how fast this hat warms his head.

I crocheted the Boy Beanie v2.0 for him, also using Red Heart Super Saver in paddy green, but it turned out too tight.  I was thinking of trying out the Husband Hat for him, but he requested a Cable Hat, like my gray one.

I really enjoy the Cable Hat pattern, but after making that hat several times over to get the right size, I had no desire to make another for a while.  The Thick Warm Crocheted Winter Hat pattern seemed like a good compromise.

This hat is my first with a brim and it looks very bulky in the picture.  When worn on an actual head instead of a yarn ball, the brim stretches out a bit more.   

In other news, I’m working on a new set of photos for the Through Any Window Baby Blanket tutorial.  Three rows were out of pattern order, so I’m re-photographing them.  The actual directions are correct, but just remember the color order is jumbled.  Also, I’m planning a new tutorial for a neat little crochet technique I came across on YouTube

Today is the third annual World Kidney Day!

      

*That’s cool* a random fact

One in nine US adults have chronic kidney disease.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

I took a walk around Mountain Lake with my brother today.  We wanted to scout out the best campsite since registration is opening up at Moran State Park for the summer season. Quite possibly the best car camping in San Juan Island, WA is located in campsites #126 though #136.  They all are on an elevated loop looking out onto Mountain Lake.  There’s a boat launch, tiny stretch of rocky beach and a hiking entrance within 500 feet of the loop.  Also, the area is far from the main road so you don’t get the car traffic like you do in the Southend sites

Can you believe this is the view from campsite #130?

 

Read more about why my trees look black on naturephotographers.net.  I’m still learning how to get a blue sky with a point and shoot and not end up with silhouetted trees.  Suggestions are appreciated!

I took more pictures of the campsite loop but, for some reason, they didn’t register on the memory card.  I think it was because I changed the batteries and the memory card was jarred in the process. 

I did get the memory card to save pictures of my Quick Winter Headband.  This free pattern gets an ‘A’ for adaptability.  Not only does any yarn weight work, you can insert any crochet stitch you like for the body of the headband as long as it starts with a base of thirteen stitches.

The headband pattern isn’t beginner friendly though, as the stitch directions for the body are not written with the pattern.  Instead, the reader is directed to the Vanilla Grit Stitch Washcloth.   

I had to frog the first row a couple times before I realized that the stitch pattern should start with row 2.  Since row 2 refers to stitches from the foundation row, it took a little extra work to figure out exactly how many single crochet stitches to skip to account for the unworked foundation.  For this reason I wouldn’t recommend this pattern to crocheters just learning to read a pattern.    

Once I had the first row figured out, the grit stitch went quick.  It’s an easy stitch, but interesting.  Also, the headband is worked entirely in one piece so there’s only two ends to weave.

The pattern calls for worsted, but I used Babysoft in Cream. The headband still came out pretty wide, about three inches. With worsted weight yarn in gauge, I think the final product would end up similar to Christina‘s St. Maurus Headwarmer.

I finally photographed my St Maurus Headwarmers from January with the buttons sewed on. I was really dreading the needle and thread until Christina suggested using buttons with large holes and a tapestry needle.  Worked like a charm!

This striped one looks a little fuzzy since I’ve been wearing it a lot in the past month. It’s great in windy weather since my ears can be easily covered with my hair pulled back.  

I like the style of this headwarmer.  I’d like to try knitting the Calorimetry for the fall.

Also, remember the Jacob’s ladder stitch baby blanket I talked about? I found out the Rainbow Bright pattern is available for free on the Coats and Clark website.

*That’s cool* a random fact

Mosquitos are twice as attracted to blue than any other color.

Read Full Post »

    

I’ve been making these scrubbies on and off for a while now.  The pattern is a no brainer, so it’s a great project for the hands when your mind is occupied.  I put all my Lily’ s Sugar and Cream scraps in a little basket with a hook, ready to crochet when I’m on the phone.

These scrubbies are also perfect cotton stash-busters.  There’s very little yarn needed, and the pattern is exceptionally easy to modify.  Subtracting a few rows or reducing the foundation chains does little to alter the finished product. 

I picked up too many stitches to gather together in my first few scrubbies.  It’s best to thread through less than half the stitches on the side, otherwise you’re left with an open hole that is difficult to pull closed.  This is what happened with the bottom right scrubbie.   

The photo mosaic shows my four favorites out of a batch of eight.  If you’re interested in the other four, I made a slide show of the complete set over at slide.com

Another free pattern with a similar design is the baby swirls hat, which is basically a giant scrubbie with only one side cinched together.  It’s a great hat for beginning crocheters and makes a cute hat for newborns.   

*That’s cool* a random fact

Cottoncan absorb up to 27 times it’s weight in water and the absorbent fibers get stronger when wet.

Read Full Post »

My Canon PowerShot A530 took a turn for the worst. While attempting to replace the batteries, I dropped my camera (again) and it broke. I was actually surprised, since this point-and-shoot model is really sturdy and has survived some pretty traumatic falls. This time the height of the plunge wasn’t astronomical, but the retractable lens took the brunt of the impact. Apparently, lenses are really integral to camera functions, so I’m dumb out of luck. A new camera is in the mail but, for now, I’m stuck sifting through my Flickr account for old project photos like this baby hat.

There’s no pattern for the newborn beanie since I just made it up as I went along. I used a partly filled party balloon and Bev’s sizing list to determine the number of increases. The hat is half double crocheted with a size G hook and a row cluster stitches. I used some scraps from my Grandma’s old wool stash so I don’t know the yarn brand. Most likely it’s virgin wool from the Mill End store, though.

This Boy Beanie v2.0 was made for my brother. Shh, I haven’t tucked in all the ends! The hat is a revised edition of the Boy Beanie published in Stitch ‘n Bitch: The Happy Hooker. I wasn’t impressed with how the pattern was written. For one, I was never sure which rows were meant to be made in the back loops only. Plus, there’s an odd ch 2 maneuver that I didn’t like since it made the seam stiff and shorter than the rest of the hat.

I do like the color changes and overall style of the hat, though. There’s not a lot of yarn required and with all the double crochet it takes very little time. And free is a very good price for a pattern.

My brother has requested a ‘less holey’ version that fits his head. He does have a big noggin so I can’t blame the pattern for the size issue. One of these days I’ll get around to making him a custom, single crochet version.

Another pattern pattern designed with guys in mind is The Husband Hat, available for free at Crafty Christina with a folded brim and minimal single color trim.

*That’s cool* a random fact

The first passengers to ride a hot air balloon were a sheep, a duck and a rooster in 1783 as a royal demonstration for the court of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette.

Read Full Post »

 

The front post dc and shell stitch combination in this Divine hat really caught my eye.  The pattern uses asymmetrical shells to force the front post stitches in one direction, making the spiral effect.  To me it looks complicated, but the pattern stitch is surprisingly straight forward and very easy to create. 

If you’re a knitter, the Odessa from MagKnits is a similar design.  I like how the beads are knitted into the spiral.  If only I was that advanced!  For my hat, I used Caron SS Heather in Denim.  The color is closer to a bluish silver than a denim, though. 

 

I made the Cable hat, below, for myself.  My double crochet hat is starting to show signs of wear after several loyal years.  Plus, with all this snow and freezing wind I needed a sturdy hat.

Compared to my old RHSS hat, this thing makes my head look huge!  There’s front and back post stitches, so it has the thickness of three layers of crochet.  My brother thinks it looks like those Russian Ushanka hats, especially if I added ear flaps.  I tend to agree, but it’s very warm.  And the hat is made with Caron Simply Soft Heather (in Charcoal), so it’s soft too. 

I learned a new technique for a nearly-seamless front post stitch join with these hats.  The pattern calls for a ch-2 before making the first front post stitch in the round.  When you come to the end of a round, you ignore this ch-2 and join directly to the front post stitch. 

This means that instead of chaining for a stitch that should be a front post, you hide this chain behind and there’s barely any difference between the join and the rest of the hat.  You can see the seam of the hat in the picture below, on the left of the cable.   

 

These patterns are both from the same designer, which are written with minimum detail.  They’re easy enough to understand if you’ve ever followed a hat pattern and there’s a stitch count at the end of every row.  Don’t be scared off by the cables in the second hat either.  The directions for cables are really clear. 

I ran into some problems with gauge and my yarn selection.  I originally used Red Heart Super Saver, but the connected front post stitches looked jilted.  Not that you can’t use Red Heart, but the cables really shine when you have a smooth yarn like Caron SS. 

The other problem was gauge.  I had the gauge with the suggested hook size, but it was mammoth in size.  The gauge is based solely on the width of the front post cable.  What I found was this gauge could be true with about three different hooks.  

Also, the cable hat especially, really stretches because of the front post stitches.  So if the hat does feel a little snug, just remember that it will ease up a bit with use.  If you want to use the official gauge, I would go with the smallest hook size possible.  I ended up using a size H crochet hook with a gauge of  13 dc and 7 rows = 10″.   Even with the size H hook, it’s still the teeniest bit loose, but I’m glad I have it for this snowy Northwest winter. 

*That’s cool* a random fact

Russia has twice the number of chess Grandmasters as Germany, its nearest competitor.

Read Full Post »

I’m doing a little blog housekeeping with my FOs from 2007.  These are my two last Soley Granny Square Hats of the half dozen I crocheted.  More of the same, I know, but I never did get tired of making them.  In case you didn’t read my earlier posts on the subject, I made these with scraps as part of a stash-busting goal.

   

 

I like that the granny hats look like they are levitating in the photos.  There’s a yarn ball under them for shape but it didn’t really show up in the picture. 

This green hat was made with RHSS in mint, white and orchid.  It was the very last hat I made and I got lazy with changing colors.  Weaving in the ends from the circle center was my least favorite part because it was easy to distort the spokes.  For that reason I used purple for the first two rows.  Compared to the other two hats I made with the circular start I think it would have looked better if I put a separate color for the first round.  It will have to do though, because I am not going back to fix it!

*That’s cool* a random fact

The Purple Earth Theory suggests that ancient microbes used retinal instead of chlorophyll on early Earth, making organisms appear purple instead of green.

Read Full Post »

As promised, here are some more Soley Granny Squares Hats by Crafty Christina.  Can you believe that I’m working on two more?  These are the two best from the second batch.  You’ll see that the others were less thought out and I was running out of good color combos in my yarn stash.  For the yellow one I went with a bumblebee feel.  The green one was inspired by Yoshi from Super Mario Brothers.   

I went a little crazy with these but after a few projects that demanded constant attention and frogging the granny squares were a pleasant side note.  The process is quick to start and, as a result, very addictive. 

First of all, you just repeat the granny motif a bunch of times and before you know it there are five little squares ready to be joined.  You see this neat little stack of grannys and feel an enormous sense of accomplishment.  The pieces are made and you’re practically done.  But wait!  You have to weave in all those ends. 

This is where I went downhill.  Instead of weaving in the ends and joining the squares I decided to make three more sets of granny squares since it is much more fun to dive through a stash and pick out colors than dig out a yarn needle.  

They piled up in my yarn basket very quickly and then I had 20 granny squares and even more ends.  This is where I decided to stop at six hats total.  I could have made more granny squares, but I couldn’t imagine subjecting myself to more ends.  I’ll post the other two Soley Granny Squares Hats after, you guessed it, I weave in the remaining ends. 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »